How to Encourage Your Children in London to Clean Up the House

 

Millions of households in the U.K. are at constant war with their children on all matters of cleanliness. So what could be the missing key in this puzzle? For starters, it’s never too early to teach your child how to be tidy. If your kid can walk and has already developed basic communication skills asking them to pick up their toys sets them on the right cleaning path.

What more can you do to encourage your kids to clean up? Read on to find out.

Lend Them a Hand

It’s easy to bark orders and instructions on what should go where and how it should be done. But at a young age, children learn by example. According to the Huffington Post, telling off kids can prove counterproductive in the long run. Instead of ordering your kids to clean and tidy up, lead by example

When they see you helping make the bed, fold their blankets, and organise their toys, it starts to feel less like a chore. For you, it’s teaching them to clean, but for them, it’s spending quality time with mommy or daddy.

Be Sensitive to Their Age 

Asking a two-year-old to help vacuum the living room or clean the dishes is not logical. However, asking them to take their dirty cup to the kitchen sink or pick up their toys is appropriate for their age.

Start with simpler tasks with younger children. As they grow, slowly adjust by assigning slightly complex tasks. By the time they are teenagers, they can properly do the laundry, clean their bedrooms, and mow the lawn, and so on.

Provide a Sense of Direction

Instead of telling your child to go clean the house, how about you assign them one chore at a time? Children know how a clean home looks like, but they need help learning how to perform different functions to get the house clean.

For example, a tidy bed looks neat and well laid. Give your kid directions on how to spread the sheets and how to tuck in the blankets. After that, you may ask them to brush the carpets, wipe the kitchen floor, or put their clothes in the basket, respectively.

Create a Simple Checklist

By referring to the checklist, a child knows exactly what they need to do at a particular time. A list saves you the time and energy of having to repeat yourself every day. It is ideal for pre-teens and older kids.

In your checklist, write the title of the chore and add a step by step guide on what should be done to complete it. For example, the title of a task could be, “clean the living room,” Illustrate how it should be done by writing in bullet points such as the following:

  • Start by clearing the table
  • Dust the sofa
  • Arrange the shelves or wall unit
  • Collect any misplaced toys
  • Vacuum the rug

Offer Rewards

Nothing gets the kids to follow instructions faster than knowing there’s a reward for them in the end. Note that a reward doesn’t necessarily mean that they get bribed using money, candy, or a present. It could simply mean that they get extra playtime or a DIY badge for being the best cleaner.

A simple reward is a great idea, especially when you’re trying to beat a deadline. Make things interesting by pitting one kid against the other to see who finishes first or who does it best. Kids love competitions and they will look forward to the tasks.

In the long run, it is not so much about getting the house clean as it is about educating and helping the child follow instructions. Exercise patience. Do not get angry if the child only manages to get half the job done.  Give it a few tries, and soon your child will get to perform cleaning tasks around the house all by themselves.

Note that your kids may not be able to accomplish all the cleaning tasks in the home. There are times when you need to call in the big guns for professional cleaning services. At Regional Services, we pride ourselves in offering professional house cleaning services at competitive prices. Fill out this form to get a free quote today!

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